FAQ
  • Electricity

  • Water

  • Gas

  • Internet

  • Removalists

How do I connect electricity if I’m moving interstate?

Whether you're moving interstate or within your region, the steps needed to ensure your current and new home are ready will remain the same. Some states like Queensland and Western Australia have energy regulations that allow the government to determine the prices and providers.

At the same time, other states run through a full retail competition, which means that the government imposes no restrictions, and you're free to choose and switch amongst electricity providers. When moving between these regulated and unregulated markets, it's important to note that prices will differ notably.

How long does it take to connect water?

The good news is that water providers do not turn the supply off between tenants, so water will already be connected when you move in. If you are responsible for paying the water bills, make sure you inform the water provider of your move-in date and details as soon as possible so that they can take a meter reading and ensure both you and the previous occupants are billed correctly. 

What does it cost to connect to natural gas?

If you're within a 20-metre radius of the main gas pipe, your gas provider won't charge you a fee to connect your new home to this main supply line. However, they may charge a connection fee, but this will depend on your provider and state.

What's the difference between NBN and broadband?

Broadband is a high-speed internet connection with high bandwidth and can carry a lot of data. Although how much data it can take will depend on where you live and the technology used in your internet connection.

NBN, or the national broadband network, uses optical fibre plus coaxial cable, copper and other technologies to create a fast and reliable connection to the internet. Which, as the name suggests, will include broadband.

What if the date of my relocation changes after booking the movers?

Most home moving companies are flexible when it comes to moving dates. Your move-in day may probably change due to external factors. For this reason, most home moving services offer flexible dates, pickup and drop-off locations and truck sizes. But they may charge an additional fee if these changes aren't made 48 hours in advance.

Everything you need for your move

Electricity Connection

What's the electricity connecting process for renters?

When moving in and out of a rental property, your process will be essentially the same as moving into a new home. However, instead of you having to organise the disconnection/connection dates, your landlord will do this.

Do I need to be there to get connected?

Moving homes is a busy time in anyone's life. Luckily, most energy providers don't need anyone home to be able to connect your new home. All you have to do is make sure that your electricity supply is switched off on the main switchboard beforehand for the technician to connect your new home successfully.

You may need to be home during this connection if you live in Queensland or New South Wales.

What do I need to do if I am vacating?

When vacating a property, switch off all lights, heating and appliances and notify your electricity provider of your moving out date. Sometimes properties can be vacant for an extended period of time between tenants. Any lights, heating or other devices left on during that period will consume electricity.

As long as you have notified your electricity provider that you are vacating a property on a given date, the cost of that consumption is not your responsibility. However, switching off lights, heating and appliances before you vacate will ensure electricity is not wasted and that’s good for your wallet!

What are my options for connecting electricity?

Your options when choosing an electricity provider depend on where you live. In some states there are more than thirty electricity providers to choose from, while other states or regions are regulated with just one electricity provider serving the whole state.

What if I want to change electricity providers?

When moving home, you're presented with an excellent opportunity to change your electricity provider. As you already have to contact them to organise the disconnection of your current home, it's only a simple extra step needed to change providers completely. This will mean that the first bill you get in your new home will become more cost-effective to your current usage and take up less room within your budget.

What if I have solar panels?

If you have a solar panel system installed, electricity generated through your solar panels is used in your home or workplace. Excess electricity you don’t use is fed back into the electricity grid that supplies both you and other users – when this happens, you’ll receive a credit on your electricity account for the amount of energy you have back to the grid.

Of course, when the sun isn’t shining, your home or office will use electricity from the grid via your electricity provider.

If your solar system includes a battery, then any excess electricity you generate during the day will be stored and used when the sun doesn’t shine.

If you have a solar system installed, that’s awesome! You’re on your way to some great savings on your electricity bills, and you’re reducing the strain on our electricity grid, which is great for the environment! The process for connecting your electricity is similar, but the pricing will differ. You will need to consider both the rate per kilowatt hour that the provider offers you for electricity you use from the grid as well as the feed-in tariff they offer for excess electricity your system generates back into the grid. Individual circumstances are important for solar customers, and our team members at HOOD take time to understand your specific case to advise on suitable plans.

What if I live in an apartment?

That will not be a problem. Electricity connections in many apartments are exactly the same as for houses. However, some apartments or commercial properties are part of an embedded network where you have fewer options and need to contact the designated energy provider directly. HOOD and your body corporate can help you with this.

When will I get my first electricity/gas bill?

Electricity bills are typically generated each quarter (4 months except if you live in Victoria which are sent out every two months. So the first energy bill you receive will always be from your old address. This bill will usually be sent a couple of weeks after your move and will cover the time from the start of the last quarter to the day you disconnected.

The first bill from the energy used in your new home could arrive between 10 and 100 days after you moved in, depending on the date you officially moved in. If you want more clarity, HOOD can help specify your specific dates.

Where does my electricity actually come from?

Electricity in Australia is generated from a number of different sources including coal, wind and hydro (water). After the electricity has been generated it enters a transmission network where it travels across long distances via high voltage transmission lines. It then enters a low voltage distribution network, often referred to as the ‘grid’, through which power is delivered to homes, offices and factories.

Regardless of which electricity provider you choose, your electricity will come from the same transmission and distribution network and therefore the same source. Electricity retailers buy electricity from the distributor and sell it on to you.

How do I connect electricity if I’m moving interstate?

Whether you're moving interstate or within your region, the steps needed to ensure your current and new home are ready will remain the same.

Some states like Queensland and Western Australia have energy regulations that allow the government to determine the prices and providers. At the same time, other states run through a full retail competition, which means that the government imposes no restrictions, and you're free to choose and switch amongst electricity providers. When moving between these regulated and unregulated markets, it's important to note that prices will differ notably.

How do I disconnect my previous address?

You need to inform your current energy provider that you're moving, as they'll typically handle any scheduled disconnections. The disconnection to your current home will usually occur the day after you move out. To ensure this process goes as smoothly as possible, HOOD is here to help. We can make sure that you give your energy provider ample time to organise the disconnection from your current home.

How do I choose the best option for me?

When connecting electricity, you’ll want to choose a provider that is both reliable and affordable. You want the electricity to be connected when promised and no nasty surprises when you receive your first bill.

Electricity is essentially charged based on how much you use, which is measured in kilowatt hours (kWh). So, it’s essential you consider the rate per kilowatt hour a provider offers you.  Generally, rates can vary from 16 cents per kilowatt hour to 40 cents per kilowatt hour, that difference can have a big impact on your wallet!

Electricity providers advertise various energy plans which detail the specific rates on offer.  Comparing between providers and their plans can be confusing as many offer different rates for different times of the day and additional incentives like ‘double up’ discounts for connecting both electricity and gas with the same provider and ‘pay on time’ discounts. Contract terms like the length of the contract, late payment and exit fees also vary between providers. How can you ensure you are comparing like-for-like? When it comes to assessing your options, knowledge and experience go a long way.

HOOD provides a service that is both independent and free of charge. We cut through the details and keep things simple.

How much notice do I need to give to disconnect?

When moving homes, you need to give your current provider at least a week's notice, but the more notice, the better. While your provider won't cut the power to your old home until a day after you've moved out, providing ample notice will mean avoiding any unnecessary hassles.

How much does electricity cost?

The amount you’ll spend on electricity per month will vary widely depending on which provider you choose, the size of your household and the types of amenities your house has. If your evening routine includes a dip in the jacuzzi and a cold beverage from the second fridge, for example, you can expect to pay a little more.

Energy prices are charged per kilowatt hour (Kwh) – which is equivalent to 3600 kilojoules. According to a survey HOOD ran in 2020, customers in NSW could spend between 19.3 and 33.4 cents per Kwh, Victorians between 19.3 and 30.7 cents per Kwh, South Australians between 26.2 and 40.4 cents per Kwh and Queenslanders between 15.5 and 27.4 cents per Kwh.

The average two-person Australian household will pay around $125 per month in electricity bills, not accounting for potential discounts and concessions.

How much it cost to get electricity connected?

 

It is possible that your energy provider may charge connections fees, which are passed on to you through your retailer. These fees can range between $10 and $100 and will appear on your first bill. HOOD is able to advise what to expect when you call us, so that you can plan for your first bill. We can help choose the right provider for you and organise your connection, minimising fees and charges. Our service is completely free of charge.

If you are a concession card holder, you may be eligible for a discount on supply and usage charges as well as connection and disconnection fees.

How long does it take to connect electricity?

It only takes a few minutes of your time and HOOD will take care of the rest. We’ll set up your connection for the date that you request; and if you need an urgent electricity connection, we may even be able to get you connected within hours. Some providers are also able to connect electricity on Saturdays.

Water Connection

How do I connect water to my new home?

Water providers do not disconnect water between tenants, so if you’re moving into an existing property, the water will already be connected.

If you live in Victoria, you will need to ensure that the water provider is notified of the date of your move and has your correct billing details. For home or property buyers, this is usually done by your conveyancer or solicitor as part of the settlement process. If you are renting, your real estate agent or landlord will let you know if they can organise this for you. Providing your details to the water provider will help ensure that both you and the previous tenants are billed correctly.

Responsibilities in other states vary. For example, if you’re renting in NSW, the water provider does not need to be notified of your move. They will continue to bill the property owner and the owner or their agent may bill you for any charges that you are responsible for. If you are a property buyer, then your conveyancer or solicitor should notify the water provider of your move in date and contact details as part of settlement.

There are many different water providers across Australia who operate based on urban or metropolitan jurisdictional zones. Each jurisdictional zone has one provider. See below for a list of water providers by state:

New South Wales

  • Central Tablelands Water
  • Goldenfields Water
  • Gosford/Wyong Councils' Water Authority
  • Hunter Water
  • MidCoast Water
  • Murray-Darling Basin Authority
  • Riverina Water County Council
  • Rous Water
  • Sydney Water

Victoria

  • Barwon Water
  • Central Highlands Water
  • City West Water
  • Coliban Water
  • East Gippsland Water
  • Goulburn Murray Water
  • Goulburn Valley Water
  • Grampians Wimmera Mallee Water
  • Lower Murray Water
  • Murray-Darling Basin Authority
  • North East Water
  • South East Water
  • South Gippsland Water
  • Southern Rural Water
  • Wannon Water
  • Western Water
  • Westernport Water
  • Yarra Valley Water

Queensland

  • Murray-Darling Basin Authority
  • Queensland Urban Utilities
  • Seqwater
  • UnityWater
  • Wide Bay Water Corporation

South Australia

  • Murray-Darling Basin Authority
  • SA Water

Western Australia

  • Busselton Water
  • Western Australian Water Corporation

Tasmania

  • Cradle Coast Water
  • Esk Water
  • Hobart Water

 

How long does it take to connect water?

The good news is that water providers do not turn supply off between tenants, so water will already be connected when you move in. If you are going to be responsible for paying the water bills, make sure you inform the water provider of your move in date and details as soon as possible so that they can take a meter reading and ensure both you and the previous occupants are billed correctly. If you live in Victoria, HOOD can take care of this process for you, while setting up your other utilities connections.

What if the property is a new property?

If you are building a new home or office you will need to contact the water provider and apply for connection to their pipes so you have access to water, wastewater and stormwater services. A builder or plumber normally does this on your behalf and there are usually associated charges.

The average cost for a new water main line in Australia ranges between $1500 to $3000.

What if my apartment isn't individually metered?

Some apartment blocks, towers and townhouse developments have just one main meter that measures water consumption for the whole property. The water provider may bill individual apartment owners for a percentage of the water used by the entire apartment block or tower.

If you are renting a property that does not have a separate water meter, you are not responsible for setting up an account with the water provider. However, the owner or their real estate agent may be able to on-bill you for water charges. Responsibilities vary from state to state so it’s important to carefully read the details in your rental agreement and discuss with your landlord, agent or tenant advocacy group if you’re unsure.

What does it cost to set up a water connection?

Most of the time, there is a fee to activate a water connection.

When the sale of a property occurs, the water provider will do a special meter reading in order to calculate the charges that are due at the time of settlement. They usually charge a fee for this which is payable by the new owner.

Some water providers charge a tenant meter read to the owner for each new tenant. This covers the cost of reading the meter between tenants and setting up a separate account for each tenant.

If you are moving to Victoria, HOOD can contact your water provider and set up your new account for free. We currently provide this service for many real estate agents as well as individual tenants. In addition to setting up a water connection at your new property, we can also help you engage electricity and gas providers in your area. On top of our regular services, we offer same-day services for those looking for urgent utility connections in their home.

What do I need to do at the property I am vacating?

If you are vacating a property and you were responsible for paying the water bill, notify the water provider of the date of your move and forwarding address. They will arrange a final meter read and send a final bill to your new address.

Where does my water actually come from?

Most urban water supply in Australia comes from rivers. The surrounding land around these rivers is called a catchment. Surface water runoff and groundwater flow via rivers and are caught in large man-made dams. The water is then treated to appropriate water quality standards and stored in reservoirs for future use. Water from these reservoirs travels via water mains to houses, schools, businesses and other users.

In some cases, your water may come from other sources such as recycled water or a desalination. Desalination is a process used to turn seawater into drinking water.

Some properties now have dual-pipe supply where one pipe supplies drinking water and the other pipe supplies recycled water which can be used for gardening, toilet flushing and other lower-grade uses.

If you live in a rural area, and do not have access to urban water supply, your water will likely come from tanks or a groundwater bore.

Catchment management authorities, water corporations and water retail providers, all work together to manage catchments, water treatment and storage facilities, pipes and other supply infrastructure.

Who is responsible for paying water bills?

Responsibilities for water charges vary depending on which state you are moving to. In Victoria, if the property has its own meter, the tenant is responsible for paying for water consumption (usually noted on the bill as water volume) and sewerage disposal charges. The landlord must pay all service charges including water supply and sewerage or drainage services. Some individual situations may differ and these are normally documented in your rental agreement.

In NSW, the landlord is responsible for paying water bills. If the premises are separately metered, and the property has water efficiency measures in place, the landlord is able to charge the tenant for water consumption. The landlord must provide you with a copy of the bill from the water provider, or other evidence, showing the cost of the water used.

Similar arrangements apply in other states such as QLD and the Northern Territory – so long as the water supply is individually metered and the tenancy agreement mentions it, tenants may be required to pay for water usage.

What if I live in a rural area?

In some rural areas, there is no urban water supplied and the property owner will need to arrange water supply from a tank or bore with a septic system to manage wastewater. For rental properties, usually the landlord is responsible for the upkeep of tanks and associated equipment like pumps. If you are renting, roles and responsibilities for water tanks and septic tanks vary and should be documented in your rental agreement. Check with your landlord, agent or tenant advocacy group if you are unsure.

Is there anything else I need to do?

It is your responsibility to provide safe access to the water meter so that the meter can be read. This means no locked gates or unrestrained animals. Failure to ensure this could result in your water supply being disconnected.

How often will I receive water bills?

Water bills are generally issued quarterly (once every three months).

Gas Connection

How do I know if I need gas connections?

You will almost certainly need a gas connection in your new home, but it does depend on the kinds of amenities the house comes with – does the kitchen come with gas stove tops? Is the water heated through gas or electricity? Does the house come with ducted heating?

More than 70% of houses in Australia are either already connected to mains gas or use LPG bottled gas. An easy way to tell if your property is connected to gas pipelines is to look for a gas metre around the outside of your property, or call HOOD on 1300 242 824.

How long does it take to connect gas?

Usually gas supply is not physically disconnected between tenants however the process of setting up an account with a provider is commonly referred to as a connection. At the beginning of your tenancy, your provider will arrange a start read of the gas metre. Gas metres are read manually by the gas distributor and data is fed back to the gas provider.

Further reads are taken bi-monthly to determine consumption, calculate costs and prepare your bill. The provider generally requires a minimum of three business days notice to ensure the start read is taken the day you move in. Metre reads are only taken on weekdays so if you are moving in on a Saturday, your start read date will be the Friday before your move.

In some cases, for example if a previous tenant has defaulted on paying their bill, a provider will manually plug the gas line. This stops gas supply to the property. Removing this plug requires a visit from a registered gas plumber organised by your gas provider.

HOOD can arrange your gas connection in one short phone call. It’s best to call us as soon as you know your move date so we can book the connection in advance.

How much natural gas is available?

Current natural gas reserves in Western Australia hold enough gas for around another century when based on a current household's average power usage.

How much does natural gas impact our environment?

Natural gas is one of the most eco-friendly and efficient non-fossil fuel power sources available. Natural gases can be extracted and transported to your home with lower levels of emissions when compared to coal power stations. Compared to grid-supplied electricity, natural gas produces up to 70% emissions. Natural gas pipelines are also underground, which means they face fewer environmental threats and interference.

How would natural gas be connected to my home?

If you don't have a natural gas line connection, your home will need an installation to connect your property to this main supply line. This installation process will see an inlet pipe run from your gas main in your street to your metre. Generally, this process can take 20-30 business days to complete.

What does it cost to get gas connected?

Gas providers generally do not charge a connection fee. Gas distributors however, are responsible for maintaining pipes and metres as well as reading metres, and do usually charge connection and disconnection fees which are passed on through your gas provider. These fees vary depending on the area you live, generally ranging between $10 and $50.

If you are a concession card holder, you may be eligible for a discount on supply and usage charges as well as connection and disconnection fees.

What does it cost to connect to natural gas?

If you're within a 20-metre radius of the main gas pipe, your gas provider won't charge you a fee to connect your new home to this main supply line. However, they may charge a connection fee, but this will depend on your provider and state.

What do I need to do if I'm vacating a property?

If you are vacating a property, remember to contact your current gas provider and advise the date you are moving so that they can take a final metre read and finalise your bill. This will ensure you don’t pay extra fees and charges after you vacate.

What is bulk hot water?

Some properties, such as large apartment buildings or townhouse developments, have a bulk hot water system where water is centrally heated and supplied directly to each apartment. This water is usually heated by gas. Each individual apartment has a hot water metre and the gas company bills individual apartments directly for their hot water usage.  

Individual tenants do not have a choice of provider for this service as it is usually determined by the building owner or body corporate. Your gas consumption for other appliances (e.g. ovens and cooktops) will be included on the same bill if you choose the same provider, or separately billed if you choose an alternative gas provider. Cold water consumption is billed separately by your water provider.

If you are moving into a large apartment, HOOD and your body corporate can help you determine if there is a bulk hot water agreement in place.

Where does my natural gas or LPG actually come from?

Natural gas deposits were formed hundreds of millions of years ago from decomposing microorganisms, plants and animals deep below the earth’s surface. Some of these deposits are located below land (onshore) whilst others are located under the ocean (offshore). Natural gas is extracted from these deposits, processed and distributed around Australia via a large network of pipelines.

Regardless of which provider you choose, your gas will come from the same distribution network. Retailers buy gas from the distributor and on-sell it to their customers.

LPG is a mixture of flammable hydrocarbon gases including butane and propane. These gases come from both onshore and offshore oil and gas deposits. The mixed gas is liquefied under pressure, reducing its volume and allowing it to be bottled and easily transported to users.

Where should my metre be located on my property?

Typically a gas metre will be found directly next to your property within 10 metres from the front left or right of your yard. If you live in a townhouse, unit or apartment, you'll usually find your gas metre in the same location as your other metres.

Will my property be disturbed during the installation of the natural gas connection?

This will depend on your home's situation and location to the main natural gas pipe. Most natural gas installations will have occurred before any paving and driveways were laid, which means that there could be some disturbance. By speaking to your gas provider, they can discuss where your gas pipeline needs to head to try and limit the disruption to your home and its pathways.

It's important to note that in most cases, the cost of reinstating your paths and driveways will fall to the property owner.

Is natural gas available at my property?

You'll be able to learn if your new property can utilise natural gas by contacting a gas retailer. Once your gas retailer has established whether or not you can use natural gas, it'll be updated with your provider.

Is natural gas cheaper than electricity?

On an annual basis, natural gas appliances are the most cost-effective. By switching to a natural gas line, you can find a plan and energy output that are better suited to your home's lifestyle and its heating, cooking and hot water needs. However, it will likely depend on your installation fees and your chosen energy provider.

I need to connect gas, what are my options?

Your options when choosing a gas provider depend on the state you live in. Victoria has 15 gas providers available, the most of any Australian state, though not every provider operates in all areas, and some will only provide a gas service if you also purchase your electricity from them. Some states and territories are regulated, and only one gas provider supplies all customers in the state.

If you live in a regional area, and don’t have access to ‘mains’ gas (natural gas delivered via pipeline), bottled LPG can usually be purchased and delivered to your door in most areas.  There are a number of LPG providers to choose from.

Internet Service

I want to connect broadband/internet, what are my options?

There are two types of services that can provide you with internet access – fixed or wireless.

Fixed internet services are connected to a specific property via a physical line, and you can only use the connection when you are at or around the property. Wireless internet services allow you the flexibility to easily relocate from one property to another or access the internet while you are on the go. The type of internet connection you can choose from depends on the infrastructure available in your area. Here’s a quick summary of current options in Australia:

Fixed
  • National Broadband Network (NBN) – fast, reliable and being rolled out across all of Australia. HOOD can help you check whether your property is ready to connect to the NBN, which is made up of a mixture of technologies. There are more than 170 internet service providers selling NBN products.
  • ADSL/ADSL2+ – the traditional form of broadband used across Australia, which is gradually being replaced by newer and faster technologies. A good option while you’re waiting for NBN access.
  • Cable Broadband – Uses existing hybrid fibre coaxial (HFC) cable networks. This option is fast and reliable but only available at limited properties.
  • Fibre Broadband – Very fast and reliable but available at limited properties, mainly in major cities and a few larger regional towns.
Wireless
  • Home Wireless Broadband (HWBB) – uses the same technology as mobile phone networks. This option requires no wires and no installation and is worth considering if you move house regularly or want internet on the go.
  • Satellite Broadband – only available as part of NBN in regional areas.
  • Fixed Wireless Broadband – only available as part of NBN in regional areas.

How do I get WiFi?

An important distinction to remember is the one between internet connection and internet access. WiFi is simply one way the internet can be distributed in your home, passing on the internet connection that is being provided through fixed or wireless broadband. That means regardless of the type of internet connection you have, you’ll be able to set up Wifi at your premises to access the internet wirelessly – as long as you have a Wifi router.

Your internet service provider will usually provide you with a router as part of your plan, but you can also buy them separately. Note that while WiFi is convenient and can connect to multiple devices at once, you will usually achieve a faster and more reliable connection via ethernet cable (plugging an internet connection directly into your computer).

Why are there so many ways to connect to the internet?

Australia’s internet infrastructure is currently in a state of transition – from our old copper ADSL network to NBN, which uses a mix of fibre, copper and other connections. In addition, Australians can also access the internet through our 4G and 5G broadband network, which uses mobile towers to send and receive data wirelessly.

Depending on the area you’re in, or the area you’re moving to, there will be different types of technologies you’ll have available to you. NBN offers a variety of fixed internet connections for residential customers:

  • Fibre to the premises (FTTP)
  • Fibre to the node (FTTN)
  • Fibre to the curb (FTTC)
  • Hybrid fibre coaxial (HFC)

Each technology provides slightly different speeds because of the physical materials used to connect your house to the internet. FTTP, for example, provides extremely fast internet connections because it uses a fibre optic cable wired directly into the property. Fibre optic cables are made of glass and transmit data through light, which allows them to send high volumes of information at blistering speeds.

The most common types of NBN connection available at residential properties are FTTC, FTTN and HFC, which are still capable of very fast download speeds. These technologies use the NBN’s fibre optic backbone network to connect to the existing copper cables leading to your house.

The reason there are so many types of fixed internet connections is the NBN is still rolling out across Australia. Ideally, we would all be connected directly through a fibre optic network, and be receiving lightning upload and download speeds. However unlike densely populated countries such as Japan, Australia has a very wide and spread-out network, which means laying down kilometres of fibre optic cable is an expensive and impractical endeavour.

NBN says its rollout is more than 90% complete, meaning most metropolitan and suburban areas in Australia should have NBN available or on the way. For rural and regional areas, cable internet (which uses Australia’s pay TV network) and satellite are often the fastest options.

How do I choose the best option for me?

When it comes to choosing a provider and plan there are three key things to consider; speed, data and cost. You’ll want a connection that is fast, provides enough data for your needs and is affordable. Here’s a quick summary:

Data

When choosing a broadband plan you will need to decide whether you want a limited or unlimited data allowance. Data is measured in gigabytes (GB) and most limited plans quote a monthly allowance. If you exceed your monthly allowance your provider will either automatically charge you for extra data or slow down your internet speed. Unlimited plans allow you to use as much data as you like but they usually come at a higher cost. 

For peace of mind, it can be tempting to choose an unlimited plan, however depending on your usage, you could be paying for data you don’t need. The average Australian household now downloads about 85GB of data per month through home internet. The best way to work out how much data you need is to have a look at your current bill or your account with your present internet services provider (ISP). If you are signing up for a new internet service and don’t have this information, take a moment to consider what you actually use the internet for and how often you use it. Here’s a guide that may help:

 

Typical Internet Activity Estimated Monthly Data Usage (GB)
Individual – email, browsing, social media, streaming music and YouTube videos  Less than 25
Couple – email, browsing, social media, streaming music and YouTube videos 100
Family of four – email, browsing, social media, streaming music and YouTube videos, downloading some HD movies and games 500
Large family or shared household – multiple users streaming videos, music, HD movies and gaming More than 500
Speed

Speed is one of the most important factors to consider when choosing a broadband plan. Megabits per second (Mbps) is used to measure how quickly you can download or upload data.  For example, an internet download speed of 40 Mbps or higher is considered fast because it can handle multiple users streaming movies or games on multiple devices at the same, without a major interruption to the service.

Since the actual speed you achieve in your home or business is dependent on many factors including the amount of internet traffic, providers are required to advertise ‘typical evening speeds’. This allows you to consider the typical speed you are likely to achieve during the busiest time on the network (between 7 and 11pm).

If you’re activating an NBN internet connection, you should be able to choose from several different speed packs, depending on your provider and location. The most common speedpack sold through major providers is NBN 50, which provides typical evening download speeds of around 45 Mbps. If you require a super-speedy internet connection, or your household needs to support a large number of devices connected to the internet at the same time, you can opt for the NBN 100 speed pack, which will give you typical evening download speeds of around 90 Mbps. Faster speed packs will, of course, mean a higher price tag.

Other factors that affect internet speed include distances of wires or cables (i.e. for ADSL, your distance from the telephone exchange), the condition of wires or cables, hardware and software.

You may have noticed it takes much longer to upload a photo to a file storage or sharing service like iCloud, than it does to download one. This is because upload speeds are generally significantly lower than download speeds. Providers are required to advertise typical download as well as upload speeds.

To put internet speed into perspective, consider downloading a high-definition (HD) movie. A typical HD movie downloaded from iTunes would be about 4 GB and take approximately five and a half minutes to download at an internet speed of 100 Mbps.

Working out what speed you need becomes more complicated for live streaming movies and shows or when multiple users are running multiple devices. For live streaming, Netflix recommends an internet speed of at least 5 Mbps for HD movies or TV shows, and 25 Mbps for ultra-HD movies or TV shows.

Here’s a guide that may help:

 

Typical Internet Activity Recommended Speed (Mbps)
Email, browsing and social media 12
Email, browsing, social media, streaming HD and ultra-HD movies and shows and making video calls (eg Skype) 25
Stream HD and ultra-HD movies and shows, making video calls and online gaming 50
Multiple users running several devices at once, streaming in HD and ultra-HD quality, downloading HD movies and online gaming 1000

Mobile wireless broadband speeds are affected by signal strength and network congestion. 3G, 4G and 5G refer to generations of wireless mobile technology, with 3G being the oldest and slowest and 5G being the latest and fastest technology. Currently most mobile broadband plans use the 4G network, though some larger providers are now offering 5G plans – but you will need devices that are 5G compatible.

Cost

Put simply, plans with unlimited data generally increase in cost proportional to the speed you choose. For plans with limited data, costs vary depending on the amount of data you choose. Data over wireless networks is generally more expensive than fixed line connections and you will usually pay less if you choose a plan with a lock-in contract.

There are some good bundles on offer that can provide you with more value for money. These include a home phone line, discounts on mobile phones and entertainment like Foxtel and Fetch TV. However, if you don’t need a home phone, you could potentially save around $20 per month by choosing a ‘naked’ broadband plan. Some providers will even allow you to keep your home phone connected at no cost, and charge you only on a per call basis.

Other things to consider are contract length (typically monthly, 12 or 24 months). Monthly plans are a great option if you are testing out a new provider as you are free to leave at the end of the month if you’re not happy with the service. They are also useful if you know you’ll be moving in less than 12 months. However, these plans often include expensive set-up fees and you usually also have to pay for the modem. Check the set-up costs before signing a contract so there are no surprises when you get your first bill.

With more than 170 internet service providers in Australia, each offering more than one plan, there’s a lot of plans to compare and consider! Call HOOD on 1800 242 824 (or have us call you) and in just a few minutes, we can find the most-suitable option for you and arrange your connection.

What if I'm switching from my current internet provider?

Whether you want to find a plan that's cheaper and better suited to your needs, changing your internet provider when moving home is simple and probably the best time. You can use our tools from HOOD to find the right internet provider for you or find it yourself. Once you have everything, all you need to do is tell us your provider info and move-in date, and we'll do the hard work for you and ensure your internet connection is ready to go when you move in.

What type of internet is available at my address?

This depends entirely on your new home's location. To find out which internet connections are available in your new area, you can contact HOOD or find out online.

What's the difference between NBN and broadband?

Broadband is a high-speed internet connection with high bandwidth and can carry a lot of data. Although how much data it can take will depend on where you live and the technology used in your internet connection.

NBN, or the national broadband network, uses optical fibre plus coaxial cable, copper and other technologies to create a fast and reliable connection to the internet. Which, as the name suggests, will include broadband.

What internet speeds will I get with NBN?

Assuming there are no issues, you can experience peak speeds from 12 MB to 100 MB. For context, high definition streaming through apps like Netflix only requires up to 3GB per hour and device, leaving lots of room.

Will I be disconnected if my property is not yet NBN-ready?

If your property is deemed not ready for service at the scheduled disconnection date, additional time will be allocated, and your service will remain connected.

What happens if I don't want to connect to NBN?

The existing copper line that broadband connections rely on is being retired. SO if your current internet connection depends on this line, you'll need to switch to an NBN-based internet service. If you choose not to move over to the NBN, your phone and internet services will be disconnected as mandated by the Australian Government and NBN.

I only have a home phone - do I need NBN?

Yes. Internet connections provided over the NBN network will replace both phones and internet services. There are exceptions if you are located within an NBN Fixed wireless or NBN Satellite area.

I have poor Wi-FI coverage in my home. Will the NBN fix this?

NBN connections cant assure the same level of Wi-FI coverage across all homes. As Wi-Fi relies on radio waves, there are an array of external factors that can be experienced differently in all homes, which means there's no guarantee that your Wi-Fi coverage will be the same. But in most general cases, NBN will improve your internet connection, especially when your modem is placed in a central location.

Moving Service

How do I find a good removalist?

Finding a trusted removalist for your move entails shopping around and checking reviews and insurance rules for various home moving companies. You should also review the company's website and read its background history, the kind of moving services provided, rates, etc. Through this, you'll be able to find a home moving company with high customer satisfaction that you feel you can put your trust in.

How much does it cost to use a removalist?

The cost of hiring removalists will differ from company to company and where you're moving home. Generally, the price for local moves will be calculated based on how many hours it takes to move. Interstate moves are calculated by how much space your items and furniture take on your moving truck.

Should I move with a removalist or do it myself?

The answer will depend on your physical abilities, transport and how many items you need to move. If you're moving out of a share house or family home, it can be doable by yourself. But moving an entire home and various large pieces of furniture can become more challenging without the help of professional movers.

What do I have to do before I move into my new home?

A few weeks before moving into a new home, you should ensure all your connections, including internet, water, gas and electricity, are set up. If you need help connecting your home, our team at HOOD can help.

What is removals insurance?

All home moving companies will have their own protection rules and insurance in place, but these won't automatically extend to customers in most cases. But it is recommended that you take out removalists insurance as this can cover any accidental loss or damage throughout your move.

What should you not pack when moving?

It's important to remember that home moving services won't include all your home items. While the specific articles will change between home moving companies, a general outline of belongings, not included when booking movers online, will consist of;

  • Flammables and explosives such as turpentine, Ammonia or Fertiliser
  • Paint or varnish
  • Car batteries
  • Perishables. Try your best to eat everything from your fridge before move day.
  • Important documents and items such as house keys, agreements, birth certificates, etc.
  • Valuable items such as jewellery
  • The box of things for the first few weeks in your new home

What if the date of my relocation changes after booking the movers?

Most home moving companies are flexible when it comes to moving dates. Your move-in day may probably change due to external factors. For this reason, most home moving services offer flexible dates, pickup and drop-off locations and truck sizes. But they may charge an additional fee if these changes aren't made 48 hours in advance.

I am having issues relocating my pet. Can you help with that?

It's important to check each company's home moving services, as some companies will happily bring your pets carrier or cage with them in their truck. If this is a service you need, double-check with your chosen home moving company.

Do you also offer relocation of single items like a big piece of furniture or electronic item?

Home moving companies will regularly move single large items. Suppose it is an abnormally large object like a piano, for example. In that case, you should let the company know its dimensions beforehand to help distinguish if it can be transported safely with them.

Can you help me to choose the proper size of the truck?

It is recommended to use 4T trucks for houses with one or two-bedroom with a maximum of two people. For two or three-bedroom houses, we recommend the 8T truck. Finally, for homes with bigger three-bedrooms or extra rooms like a study, storage room etc., it's best to opt for 10T trucks.